Interesting Information

  • The pipes are in mahogany chambers that extend 100 feet down the north and south aisles of the church. When the organ is completed in this “surround-sound” form, we will be able to record with the latest technology so that people can have the physical idea of how this organ sounds at home.
  • There are 32’ long pipes that are actually suspended from the roof of the side aisles in the chambers.
  • The ivory keys and stop knobs on the console were made from a trophy tusk that was put up for auction.
  • Having “dueling” tubas at the west and east ends of the church allows festival dialogue on feast days.
  • The Tuba Mirabilis is positioned so that its mouth speaks directly to the apex of the apse, casting the sound straight down the main aisle, and increasing the power of the stop by 3 times!
  • The present console (from the first Skinner organ that was purchased, Op. 762) has a tracker-touch, with little needles beneath each key.  Skinner only put this rare feature in a few of his organs.  It was discovered quite accidentally by our organ restorer, Nelson Barden, on one of his first trips to see the organ in storage, long before its restoration.
  • The 32’ Open Wood Diapason is made of sugar pine and is two feet square:  large enough for the children’s choir to crawl through when it was in storage!  It suspends from the roof of the side aisle chambers.
  • The Vox Humana chorus in the Echo division is second only in size to the Wanamaker Organ.  It is a seven rank chorus!
  • After releasing a loud chord on the organ, the sound lasts another 3-5 seconds, depending on the humidity index.
  • Children who visit on school tours have called this instrument the “coolest thing” they have ever seen, and several have expressed serious interest in learning more about how to play it.
  • Young organ students, inspired by the sound of this organ and the entire restoration process are training to play the organ and to learn the art of organ restoration and maintenance!